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Kavaḍe in the News

Kavaḍe in the News (3)

Kavaḍe (ಕವಡೆ) a niche toy hive bringing you a wide array of Indian traditional games and toys. Follow this blog for the latest collection of toys, games, events and much more

Game of Life

This version of Snakes and Ladders includes folk art forms of Gond and Kalamkari, while introducing players to the philosophy of karma that the game was traditionally associated with

BENGALURU: Snakes and Ladders may not rank the highest on lists of world’s most fun games but this new version sure adds layers of creative complexity to it. Kavade, a city-based store that retails traditional games, recently launched two DIY kits for Snakes and Ladders. Children can not only assemble their own game but also learn more about the Indian art forms of Gond and Kalamkari. Each kit comprises a nine-piece jigsaw puzzle gameboard, 24 ladder tiles (which can be placed anywhere and changed around from game to game), snake templates (also movable) that need to be painted, dice, two pawns, and paints and
a brush.

These board games pack in fun facts about being Indian

From cards that call out social prejudice to Snakes and Ladders with karmic philosophy, these India-centric board games made their debut during the pandemic

Roll the dice, step back in time (Bharata 600 BC)

Caprisoned elephants, turbanned rajahs, shining swords, a quiver full of arrows, messenger pigeons and the glorious promise of war — you don’t need a magic carpet to travel back in time. Bharata 600 BC, a board game, will take you back to ancient India where many a kingdom’s fate was sealed by behind-the-scenes puppet masters.

Conceptualised by Cristina Maiorescu, ideated by Pallavi Nopany and illustrated by Ishan Trivedi, Bharata 600 BC takes players through a time in India where territories were enlarged via alliances, trade or battle. Played on a board that depicts the map of India in 600 BC, it shows the country at the end of the Vedic period, when 16 independent kingdoms were in power. Each player is assigned a kingdom and has to expand territory as the game progresses. Players choose their leadership persona and are then granted abilities to complement their personality.

The art of spinning is coming back, thanks to the efforts of people like Madhav Sahasrabudhe

There is an air of peace and calm as you walk on to the terrace of Kavade Attic on 1st Main in Sheshadripuram. The cosy ambience is set up with cane mats on the floor and lots of charkhas (spinning wheels). Madhav Sahasrabudhe, a mechanical engineer from Pune, catches your eye.

Dressed in a khadi kurta and trousers made from the yarn he spun, the man is engrossed in spinning. Madhav is in the city for the recently-concluded two-day spinning workshop, organised by Kavade Attic. As he spins, the spinner talks about the art and the calming effect it has on one’s mind.

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